"Sharing can be a way of healing. Grief and loss can isolate,
anger even alienate. Shared with others, emotions unite
as we see we aren't alone. We realize others weep with us."
~Susan Wittig Albert

Through our writing, we walk out of the darkness into the light
together, one small step at a time, recording history, educating
America, and we are healing.
~CJ/Todd Dierdorff



Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Vietnam War Commemoration Logo and Seal

VIETNAM WAR
COMMEMORATION LOGO


About the Logo

A representation of the Vietnam Service Ribbon rests atop the inner rings of the logo.

"The Vietnam Service Medal is awarded to all members of the United States Armed Forces serving in Vietnam and contiguous waters or airspace thereover, and members of the Armed Forces of the United States in Thailand, Laos, or Cambodia, or the airspace thereover, during eligible periods and serving in direct support of operations in Vietnam."

The red, white, and blue inner rings represent the flag of the United States of America.

The outer black ring serves as a reminder of the prisoners of war and those missing in action.

The Great Seal represents the contributions of Federal agencies, governmental and non-governmental organizations that served with, or in support of, the Armed Forces, and the contributions made on the home front by the people of the United States during the Vietnam War.

The six additional seals represent the service and dedication of the men and women of the following organizations, presented in order of precedence, left to right, top to bottom, the U.S. Army, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Merchant Marine.

The seven white stars between the seals symbolize the contributions and sacrifices made by the United States and its allies: Vietnam, the Republic of Korea, Australia, New Zealand, Philippines and Thailand.

The center circle contains a map of Vietnam in black, with outlines of Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand representing the contiguous territories where U.S. Armed Forces served.

The gold color of the banner and the center circle represents the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War.

The laurel wreath signifies honor to all who served.


Commemoration Seal

ABOUT THE SEAL


"The United States of America Vietnam War Commemoration" is the official title given to the Department of Defense program in the 2008 National Defense Authorization Act.

A representation of the Vietnam Service Medal (ribbon) rests below the inner rings of the Seal.

The red, white, and blue inner rings represent the flag of the United States of America and recognize all Americans, both military and civilian, who served or contributed to the Vietnam War effort.

The outer black ring serves as a reminder of those who were killed in action, held as prisoners of war or listed as missing in action during the Vietnam War. 

The black ring surrounds the red, white and blue rings to call attention to their sacrifices, the sacrifices of their families, and the defense of our nation’s freedom.

Within the blue ring are the words "Service, Valor, and Sacrifice"; virtues demonstrated by our veterans during the Vietnam War. 

The gold-rimmed white star located between the words "Service" and "Valor" represents hope for the families of those veterans for which there has not been a full accounting. 

The blue-rimmed gold star located between the words "Valor" and "Sacrifice" represents the families of those veterans who paid the ultimate sacrifice during the war. 

The blue star at the bottom of the inner blue ring represents the families of all veterans and symbolizes their support from home.

At the bottom of the inner blue ring are six white stars, three on each side of the blue star. These six white stars symbolize the contributions and sacrifices made by the United States and its Allies Australia, New Zealand, The Philippines, Republic of Korea, and Thailand.

The center circle contains a map of Vietnam in black outline relief, signifying both the country and the Vietnamese veterans who stood with our veterans. The subdued outlines of Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and surrounding waters represent the area of operation where U.S. Armed Forces served. 

The white number "50th" emblazoned over the map, and the outer and inner gold rings which make traditional use of the color to signify the 50th anniversary, symbolize the specific mission of the Department of Defense program as outlined in the Congressional language "to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War."

The green laurel wreath signifies honor for all who served.

The seal’s blue background is the same color as the canton in the United States Flag.

"No event in American history is more misunderstood than the Vietnam War. It was misreported then, and it is misremembered now."   Richard Nixon, New York Times, March 28, 1985

“I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. The something I ought to do, I can do. And by the grace of God, I will.” ~Everett Hale


Add your opinion, thought, or comment, about this post. You are also invited to write about anything you want to share.  Send it to me in an e-mail and I will be proud to post it for you.

E-mail CJ

Memoirs From Nam is YOUR blog.



10 comments:

  1. Do NOT Need that..........We already have the VNSM!
    "The Vietnam Service Medal is awarded to all members of the United States Armed Forces serving in Vietnam and contiguous waters or airspace thereover, and members of the Armed Forces of the United States in Thailand, Laos, or Cambodia, or the airspace thereover, during eligible periods and serving in direct support of operations in Vietnam."
    Why do we need another logo or seal created 40 Plus Years Later that means NOTHING to me at least

    ReplyDelete
  2. To Anonymous - Many of us have prepared the way for the heroes and heroines who have and are returning from stents in the War against terrorism. We will not allow these troops to receive the same type of reception we received when we returned. Here in Georgia, a number of us received invitations to attend the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War. For me and my close friends that attended, it was a very special day. Governor Nathan Deal welcomed us home. To everyone of us, it was a sentiment we all relished. I am sorry you will not allow yourself to enjoy the healing this might allow you.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I blogged for about a year about my service in Vietnam including some observations on the reporting and misreporting of that war. Those blog posts are still available on my website/weblog. I also compiled the posts into a memoir that is available for free on Smashwords.com. It felt good to get it all down for future generations to read. Thousands have read it on the weblog and more than a thousand have downloaded the compilation. We need to share our stories so that our progeny will be left with more than just the ideological rants of the media and the antiwar activists who bedeviled us when we returned. The commemoration seal described in this post is a small token but an important one of the healing that has yet to occur. Embrace it...

    ReplyDelete
  4. That's wonderful, Jack. I applaud you for writing it down.

    It IS time for our future generations to know the truth -- and from the veterans who were there. I'm proud to have had even a small part in sharing these important stories here on the blog.

    Well done, Jack.

    ReplyDelete
  5. CAN I GET A COPY OF THE 2 DIFFERENT SEALS AND LOGO'S,,, I AM A 100% DISABLED AGENT ORANGE VIETNAM VETERAN ... CONTACT
    ROBERT G. WILSON SR 532 E. MAIN ST POB 434 ROCHESTER,IL.62563
    rollingeagle@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Mr. Wilson,
      Thank you for your service and Welcome Home.

      I'm sincerely sorry, but I have no knowledge about where you can get the seals and logos. Maybe you could do a search on the internet to find out.

      My warmest regards and respect,
      CJ

      Delete
  6. I notice that, with all that attention to detail, there is not a single mention of Agent Orange anywhere in the Commemoration literature at all! I think that is a shameful 'oversight' very probably intentional. I believe that the down-playing of the impact of herbicide use in Vietnam, on the land, the people and our own troops is a blatant attempt to re-write History to cover our 'mistakes'. The Australian veterans have raised hell about this fact to the point of getting an acknowledgment (and possibly an apologyP) from their government. The impact of dioxin and other toxins during the Vietnam War had global effects and it continues to be an active player in many veteran disabilities, now down into the third generation. I would like to hear an apology for this missing piece from the Commemoration Panel!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John Blessing, CW2, Dust Off pilotNovember 5, 2015 at 11:07 AM

      Absolutely Mr. Rossie,
      I lost my prostrate to Agent Orange then Agent Orange kicked in again and gave me NonHogkins Lymphoma. I finished chemotherapy on that bout and now 6 months later the doctors say that the lymphoma has reoccurred. All thanks to Agent Orange and its insidious effect on we who served in Vietnam and came in contact with the deadly stuff. Our country used this chemical without first knowing what it would do to human beaning's. As I now understand, Agent Orange has cost the United States more money than any other afflictions beset upon the American Solider. Forty plus years post Vietnam and we still have America's finest falling to the effects of that war.

      Delete
  7. Do I need permission to use this Commemoration Seal or is it free to use in conjunction with a Vietnam reunion event?

    ReplyDelete
  8. I believe it's free for anyone to use.
    Best wishes to you with your reunion.
    CJ

    ReplyDelete

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